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Struck by Genius

How a Brain Injury Made Me a Mathematical Marvel
eBook

From head trauma to scientific wonder—a "deeply absorbing . . . fascinating" true story of acquired savant syndrome (Entertainment Weekly).
Twelve years ago, Jason Padgett had never made it past pre-algebra. But a violent mugging forever altered the way his brain worked. It turned an ordinary math-averse student into an extraordinary young man with a unique gift to see the world as no one else does: water pours from the faucet in crystalline patterns, numbers call to mind distinct geometric shapes, and intricate fractal patterns emerge from the movement of tree branches, revealing the intrinsic mathematical designs hidden in the objects around us.

As his ability to understand physics skyrocketed, the "accidental genius" developed the astonishing ability to draw the complex geometric shapes he saw everywhere. Overcoming huge setbacks and embracing his new mind, Padgett "gained a vision of the world that is as beautiful as it is challenging." Along the way he fell in love, found joy in numbers, and spent plenty of time having his head examined (The New York Times Book Review).

Illustrated with Jason's stunning, mathematically precise artwork, his singular story reveals the wondrous potential of the human brain, and "an incredible phenomenon which points toward dormant potential—a little Rain Man perhaps—within us all" (Darold A. Treffert, MD, author of Islands of Genius: The Bountiful Mind of the Autistic, Acquired, and Sudden Savant).

"A tale worthy of Ripley's Believe It or Not! . . . This memoir sends a hopeful message to families touched by brain injury, autism, or neurological damage from strokes." —Booklist

"How extraordinary it is to contemplate the bizarre gifts that might lie within all of us." —People


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Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780544045644
  • Release date: April 22, 2014

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9780544045644
  • File size: 19829 KB
  • Release date: April 22, 2014


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Formats

OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

Languages

English

From head trauma to scientific wonder—a "deeply absorbing . . . fascinating" true story of acquired savant syndrome (Entertainment Weekly).
Twelve years ago, Jason Padgett had never made it past pre-algebra. But a violent mugging forever altered the way his brain worked. It turned an ordinary math-averse student into an extraordinary young man with a unique gift to see the world as no one else does: water pours from the faucet in crystalline patterns, numbers call to mind distinct geometric shapes, and intricate fractal patterns emerge from the movement of tree branches, revealing the intrinsic mathematical designs hidden in the objects around us.

As his ability to understand physics skyrocketed, the "accidental genius" developed the astonishing ability to draw the complex geometric shapes he saw everywhere. Overcoming huge setbacks and embracing his new mind, Padgett "gained a vision of the world that is as beautiful as it is challenging." Along the way he fell in love, found joy in numbers, and spent plenty of time having his head examined (The New York Times Book Review).

Illustrated with Jason's stunning, mathematically precise artwork, his singular story reveals the wondrous potential of the human brain, and "an incredible phenomenon which points toward dormant potential—a little Rain Man perhaps—within us all" (Darold A. Treffert, MD, author of Islands of Genius: The Bountiful Mind of the Autistic, Acquired, and Sudden Savant).

"A tale worthy of Ripley's Believe It or Not! . . . This memoir sends a hopeful message to families touched by brain injury, autism, or neurological damage from strokes." —Booklist

"How extraordinary it is to contemplate the bizarre gifts that might lie within all of us." —People


Expand title description text